Exoplanet transits

It is possible to observe transits of exoplanets by means of moderate equipment. The following results were obtained using a 5" refractor coupled with a small Sigma402 CCD camera (KAF0402ME chip). It seems essential to apply auto guiding, not only to keep the star field in the CCD frame over some 5 hours, but also to use the same pixels on the CCD chip for the same stars during the entire session. Exposure time of the 100 to 600 single frames should be relatively long (1 to 2 minutes each) in order to compensate for seeing and other atmospheric fluctuations such as slowly moving thin clouds (cirrus). Such long exposure time is another reason to apply auto guiding. It seems advisable to improve signal-to-noise ratio by diminishing the sky background in urban areas by means of green (V) filters or (Neodymium) broad band interference filters. Auto guiding was performed using a Starlight Xpress Lodestar auto guider controlled by PHD guiding software, a really easy-to-use combination. Processing of the data is just as easy with Muniwin followed by upload of the light curve to TRESCA data base.


RR Lyrae Stars

All except one of these light curves were obtained by means of my SIGMA402 CCD camera in combination with either my 8" LX200GPS, my 102 mm Skywatcher FH refractor, or the 130 mm Takahashi apo refractor of the Kirchheim Public Observatory. One result was obtained by means of the 20 inch Newtonian and an STL-6303E CCD camera of the Kirchheim Observatory.



Delta Scuti Stars

All of these light curves have been recorded by means of my SIGMA402 CCD camera combined with either my 8" LX200GPS, or the 130 mm apochromatic Takahashi refractor of the Kirchheim Public Observatory.



Eclipsing Binaries

All of these light curves were obtained by means of my SIGMA402 CCD camera in combination with either my 8" LX200GPS, my 102 mm Skywatcher FH refractor, or the 130 mm Takahashi apo refractor of the Kirchheim Public Observatory.